COVID-19- 
Previous Cases Of Coronavirus-Like Pandemics In The World

The world is being ravaged by Covid 19. The confirmed cases at March 27, 2020 is over 400,000 with over 20,000 dead. 114 countries have been affected by this virus with Italy recording the highest rate of death due to the outbreak. Covid-19 is caused by a novel coronavirus, the family of virus that includes the common flu and SARS. It was first reported in December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei province of China and officially became a pandemic in 2020.

There have been other cases of pandemic that has happened in the world before Covid-19.

SOME PANDEMICS IN EARLY HISTORY


1) The first recorded pandemic happened during the Peloponnesian War in 430 BC. The disease passed through Libya, Ethiopia and Egypt, it crossed the Athenian walls as the Spartans laid siege. As much as two-thirds of the population died. The symptoms included fever, thirst, bloody throat and tongue, red skin and lesions. 

2) The Antonine plague happened in 165 A.D., it was possibly an early appearance of smallpox that began with the Huns. The Huns then infected the Germans, who passed it to the Romans and then returning troops spread it throughout the Roman empire. Symptoms included fever, sore throat, diarrhea and, if the patient lived long enough, pus-filled sores. This plague continued until about 180 A.D.

 

3) The Cyprian plague happened in 250A.D. and it was named after the first known victim, the Christian bishop of Carthage, the Cyprian plague entailed diarrhea, vomiting, throat ulcers, fever and gangrenous hands and feet. The plague  started in Ethiopia, it passed through Northern Africa, into Rome, then onto Egypt and northward.

4) The Justinian plague first appeared in Egypt in  the Justinian plague spread through Palestine and the Byzantine Empire, and then throughout the Mediterranean. Recurrences of the plague over the next two centuries eventually killed about 50 million people, 26 percent of the world population. It is believed to be the first significant appearance of the bubonic plague, which features enlarged lymphatic gland and is carried by rats and spread by fleas.

5) Leprosy(11th Century), Though it had been around for ages, leprosy grew into a pandemic in Europe in the Middle Ages, resulting in the building of numerous leprosy-focused hospitals to accommodate the vast number of victims.

SOME OTHER CASES OF PANDEMICS

6) The Black Death (1350) was responsible for the death of one-third of the world population, this second large outbreak of the bubonic plague possibly started in Asia and moved west in caravans

7) The Columbian exchange(1492), The Spanish arrived in the Caribbean with diseases such as smallpox, measles and bubonic plague which were passed along to the native populations by the Europeans. With no previous exposure, these diseases devastated indigenous people, with as many as 90 percent dying throughout the north and south continents.

 

8) Cholera pandemic (1817), This wave of the small intestine infection originated in Russia, lAA where one million people died. Spreading through feces-infected water and food, the bacterium was passed along to British soldiers who brought it to India where millions more died. The reach of the British Empire and its navy spread cholera to Spain, Africa, Indonesia, China, Japan, Italy, Germany and America, where it killed 150,000 people. A vaccine was created in 1885, but pandemics continued.

9) Fiji Measles Pandemic (1875), This happened after Fiji was ceded to the British Empire, a royal party visited Australia as a gift from Queen Victoria. Arriving during a measles outbreak, the royal party brought the disease back to their island, and it was spread further by the tribal heads and police who met with them upon their return. Spreading quickly, the island was littered with corpses that were scavenged by wild animals, and entire villages died and were burned down, sometimes with the sick trapped inside the fires. One-third of Fiji’s population, a total of 40,000 people, died.

10) Russian flu (1889), The flu pandemic started in Siberia and Kazakhstan, traveled to Moscow, and made its way into Finland and then Poland, where it moved into the rest of Europe. By the following year, it had crossed the ocean into North America and Africa. By the end of 1890, 360,000 had died.

11) Spanish flu (1918), The avian-borne flu resulted in 50 million deaths worldwide, it was first observed in Europe, the United States and parts of Asia before swiftly spreading around the world. At the time, there were no effective drugs or vaccines to treat this killer flu strain. Wire service reports of a flu outbreak in Madrid in the spring of 1918 led to the pandemic being called the “Spanish flu.”But the flu threat disappeared in the summer of 1919 when most of the infected had either developed immunities or died.

Spanish flu (1918), The avian-borne flu resulted in 50 million deaths worldwide, it was first observed in Europe, the United States and parts of Asia before swiftly spreading around the world. At the time, there were no effective drugs or vaccines to treat this killer flu strain. Wire service reports of a flu outbreak in Madrid in the spring of 1918 led to the pandemic being called the “Spanish flu.”But the flu threat disappeared in the summer of 1919 when most of the infected had either developed immunities or died.

SOME PANDEMICS IN RECENT YEARS

12) Asian flu (1957), Started in Hong Kong and spread throughout China and then into the United States, the Asian flu became widespread in England where, over six months, 14,000 people died. A second wave followed in early 1958, causing an estimated total of about 1.1 million deaths globally, with 116,000 deaths in the United States alone. A vaccine was developed, effectively containing the pandemic.

13) HIV/AIDS (1981), AIDS destroys a person’s immune system, resulting in eventual death by diseases that the body would usually fight off. Those infected by the HIV virus encounter fever, headache, and enlarged lymph nodes upon infection. When symptoms subside, carriers become highly infectious through blood and genital fluid, and the disease destroys t-cells. Treatments have been developed to slow the progress of the disease, but 35 million people worldwide have died of AIDS since its discovery, and a cure is yet to be found.

14) SARS. First identified in 2003 after several months of cases, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome is believed to have possibly started with bats, spread to cats and then to humans in China, followed by 26 other countries, infecting 8,096 people, with 774 deaths.

 

 


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